Press Enter

PROJECT TITLE

    Press Enter

    Get £30 off all projects above £200. Simply contact us upon completion of the project, and we will refund you. 10th May to 10th June.

    Blog

    New Enterprise Service from Crayfish.io offers an integrated solution

    By Crayfish

     

     

    New Enterprise Service from Crayfish.io offers an integrated solution

    We have launched a new Enterprise Service, aimed at supporting businesses of all sizes in every sector to fulfil their Chinese ambitions.

    Acting as your trusted partner, We don’t only help you develop your China strategy but also deliver your tactical activities, flawlessly project managing every element of the whole process to make sure the right elements are in place at the right time.

     

    What is the Crayfish Enterprise Service?

    For Western companies dealing with China, the upside must be so great that it’s worth making the effort. But things often change along the way, especially in China, where everything is very fluid.

    In any commercial relationship, there are a lot of individual activities necessary to facilitate communications and ensure that both sides understand what’s happening in it.

    Some of them are dynamic and ongoing in terms of meetings, documentation transfers, emails, contracts and so on. Others are more fundamental, such as translating technical manuals to enable technology to be well understood.
    We are organising the whole process – so it is more than a collection of individual activities. We help to design your strategy, architecting a tailored package of activities to meet your specific needs in relation to your Chinese market or partner.

    We also offer ongoing support to anticipate the potential problems/ changes that are likely to occur.  From our own experience, these can arise both at the operational level for the actual activities and at high level for board decisions.

     

    What services do we provide?

    We offer a fully bilingual, integrated solution – from strategy to execution.

     

    Why Crayfish Enterprise Service?

    • We combine In-house expertise with global network of Chinese speaking talent.
    • We provide full services. This saves your resources in searching and managing multiple service providers for your various needs.
    • We are proactive. While talking to clients about their needs, we identify issues that you may not have considered and alert you to these at an early stage.

    If you are interested, please visit our Enterprise Service page to find our more.  You could also contact us here if you have any enquiries.

     

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Doing Business in China:  Tackling the talent shortage challenge

    By Crayfish

     

    Doing Business in China:  Tackling the talent shortage challenge

    Ting Zhang, Founder & CEO Crayfish.io

     

    China has been through the “growing pain” of lacking a skilled labour force for the past decade, and it is not getting any better soon, according to various British business leaders in China I talked to during my recent trip.

    So as a foreign business looking to set up or already operating in China, where do you find the talent you need to grow your business? What is the best way to employ them?  And how do you keep them loyal and productive?

    In the first part of my blog on this important topic, I will aim to help you work out the “where” question:

    To start with, if your operation is based in a Tier 1 ciity, then you have a larger pool from which to select your talent. For example, Shanghai hosts the largest number of multinational headquarters – most concentrated in the banking/financial, semi-conductor, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The chance of finding highly technical, bilingually fluent middle and senior managers is high. In Beijing, energy, IT / telecoms and software development are among the most concentrated sectors, thanks to the existence of over 600 research institutions and universities and the largest number of foreign R&D centres in China.

    If you are looking for manufacturing talent, then the Bay Area surrounding Guangzhou and Shenzhen offers aworld-class manufacturing hub, which is responsible for the production of most electronics goods worldwide.  Home to IT giants like Huawei and Tencent, Shenzhen is becoming a major hub for foreign high-tech companies in China, while also attracting notable domestic ones.

    Hangzhou was not regarded as a Tier 1 city until the rise of eCommerce as a major force of employment in recent years. Less than 30 minutes by high-speed train from Shanghai, the city is now home to e-Commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding and many innovation driven start-ups inspired and funded by Alibaba and its ex managers. It is also now developing fast in Fintech.

    However, the abundance of talent in Tier 1 cities comes with a high price tag. Shanghai is the most expensive city in China and the cost of a senior manager is now higher than that in the UK.   Costs are rising in the capital too but hiring in some districts is less expensive than others and businesses in Beijing now have expanded to beyond the 5thRing Road and into the neighbouring counties.

    If your business does not have to be located in one of these cities, you can save at least 20% to 40% of staff costs by operating in Tier 2 cities such as Chengdu, Tianjin, Nanjing and Xi’an.  These cities still have large populations and excellent infrastructure. However, they have been slower in opening up to Western businesses due to policy and geographical reasons, so the cost of living is considerably lower than in Tier 1 cities.

    Chengdu is known to be one of the best places to live in China.  As one of China’s traditional industrial bases, the city is home to more than 45 higher educational institutions. It is becoming one of the best places for MNCs to expand into the West of China. Chengdu has a large pool for manufacturing roles but also software engineering and games, all coming with about 30% or even 50% less cost, with the less skilled meaning the bigger gap in salary.

    Compared to T1 cities, the attrition rate is also lower in T2 cities –typically single digit in Chengdu, for example. On the other hand, it is more difficult to recruit people with good English skills or an international outlook in these cities in general because fewer Western businesses are operating there.

    If you are a British business, then you can either recruit your talent locally in China through multiple channels available to you or consider finding people when they are studying in the UK, and then hire them in China on local terms.  There are more then 100,000 Chinese students studying in the UK at any given time and they are relatively concentrated for recruitment purposes.

    For roles that require more experience, you can tap into the large Chinese communities in the UK. Chinese professionals are now working in the UK in all fields of technology and some of them are looking to return to China for better career opportunities, so your offer could be well timed for them.

    In the next part, I will explore what to look out for in your perfect Chinese employees, and what it takes to keep them happy and loyal.

     

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Doing business with China: Business Dinner Etiquette

    By Crayfish

     

    Doing business with China: Business Dinner Etiquette

    Personal relationships are important in any business context, but to build successful relationships in China it is crucial to start by understanding cultural differences. This is especially true in social situations like business lunches and dinners.

    Ting Zhang, founder, and CEO of Crayfish.io offers some advice to those visiting China:

    Always accept hospitality when it is offered, she says: “Chinese people are used to having big meals at both lunch and dinner – so it is not wise to insist on having sandwiches for lunch, or worse still, to suggest skipping lunch altogether.

    Banqueting is popular and formal, with your host preparing a seating plan, often in a VIP room. Dress code depends on who you are meeting – if it is with VIPs, then you are expected to dress smartly, but if you are with people you already know, you can be more relaxed.

    “Your host will order everything for the whole table. Ask what it is before eating it if you are unsure and if you are served something you don’t like, just leave it.

     

    What if I am a vegetarian?
    “If you are a vegetarian or cannot eat certain types of food, you must inform your host ahead of time. Vegetarian food is unusual in China, but if you give notice, nice dishes can be prepared with a bit of creativity from the chef on the day. Otherwise, you may end up with only one vegetable dish in front of you!”

     

    3 Facts to understand the Chinese Cultural better! 
    1 – Toasts (Gan Bei – ‘bottoms up’)

    Made by the host at the outset and then people take turns to make toasts throughout a meal, she adds: “That said, it’s important to watch what you drink. Maotai is typically the favoured choice but it is strong, so be wary of drinking too much of it.

    2 – “Chopsticks (Kuai Zi)

    These are often the only utensils available – but it is perfectly acceptable to eat with your hands. And there are other aspects of table manners to note. For example, it is bad practice to turn over a fish, so you should never do this. It’s wise to leave a bit of food on your plate to indicate that you are full up.”

    3- Finally, she says, don’t be offended if people spit out bones or burp at the table, because this is acceptable in Chinese culture. She advises visitors to steer clear of controversial political topics in conversation and to offer to pay for at least one meal if you are with the same hosts for a few days.

     

    Crayfish.io assist people in business who want to get to grips with cultural differences, or who need to plan a trip and organise a schedule in China. It matches talented Chinese speaking professionals with Western businesses who need help in dealing with their Chinese partners and audiences, providing a source of qualified people to undertake projects and offer information, knowledge and cultural insight.

     

    See also: Gifting etiquette

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    How to do WeChat marketing: the ultimate beginner’s guide

    By Crayfish

    How to do WeChat marketing: the ultimate beginner’s guide

     

    If you are doing business with China, you might already know that Western social media platforms like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and so on are banned in China. In fact, Weibo, WeChat, Youku and more are the main social media channels in China.

    So how can you use WeChat for business from marketing perspective?

    Let’s start with what account you should have for your company.

     

    Which account should I use? How do I register an account as a foreign company?

    There are three different types of WeChat official accounts:

    1. Subscription paid account
    2. Service account
    3. Enterprise account

    We talked about the differences among them and which one is more suitable for your business in our previous blog. We also wrote about how to register an official WeChat account as a foreign company in the same blog. Please have a read if you are interested.

     

    How to  increase my WeChat official account followers?

    Once you have your official account set up, you are ready to spread the word and get followers to your account.

    1. Content, content, content

    As you can imagine, Chinese consumers are being bombarded constantly by brands on WeChat, so it is crucial that your content is informative and consistently good.

    People get bored really easily and they will only share your WeChat post if they believe it’s relevant and useful. There are also different types of content that you could publish through your WeChat account, ranging from articles, images, creative posts H5 and videos.  I would recommend that you should move away from just publishing articles through WeChat to optimise your account and increase the quality of user experience.

    1. Use your QR code

    QR code might not be commonly used in the West, but it’s literally everywhere in China.

    WeChat automatically creates a QR code for each official account. You can post your QR code on all marketing channels, such as social media, packaging or even your business card.  But this doesn’t mean people will just scan your QR code, you’ll need to give people a reason to follow your account. Prizes, discounts, or free gifts can act as great incentive to boost your followers.

    1. Use WeChat paid media to run WeChat marketing campaigns wisely

     There are two main ways of doing paid advertisement on WeChat. The most familiar way for advertising is to promote on WeChat Moments. A Moments feed appear in the user’s Moments feed flow where a user can see friends’ shared photos, articles, or status updates. Another option for brands are WeChat banner ads which appear at the end of an article published by an Official Account.

    Both of these options can be expensive for small brands. But if you are a well-known brand, these can be quite effective to engage with your target audience.

    1. KOL

     KOLs (key opinion leaders) are popular accounts that already have a large number of followers. They are not necessarily celebrities, but bloggers, or industry experts that have built up a loyal fan base.

    Chinese consumer love and trust KOLs. They are much more comfortable with brand sponsored content. In fact, they see it as proof of authenticity of the KOL if they see more sponsored content.

    Brands could sponsor the content for KOL to publish on their WeChat account to promote your brand. Depending on the number of followers and the quality of the accounts, the price of sponsorship of a post can vary widely. So please search as many KOLs as possible or look for professional help.

    1. Mini programme

     Tencent launched mini programmes in 2017 and soon become the trendy channel that many brands in China want to tap into. They are sub-apps within WeChat, built using WeChat’s programming language. They enable to provide advanced features to users such as e-commerce, task management, coupons etc. Mini-programme is not for every brand but can be worth looking into as a way to engage and stay connected with customers.

     

    As you can tell now, WeChat is a very complicated platform when it comes to marketing and it requires expertise and huge energy to manage, especially for SMEs.  Our freelancers and partners are able to help you to navigate around WeChat marketing. We also offer a managed package service which includes account set up via Crayfish and WeChat platform management.

    If you are interested, why don’t you post a project on Crayfish.io now? You can see some budget suggestions on our Digital Marketing page. We are also very happy to answer your questions. Please feel free to contact us.

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Doing business with China: gifting etiquette

    By Crayfish

     

     

    Building personal relationships is an intrinsic part of doing business in China and exchanging gifts can help that greatly. But what do you take, and who should receive your gifts?

    Here are a few tips from Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of Crayfish.io.

    Ting says: “My planning for a trip to China usually starts with a list of people to visit, and then I work out gifts to take and spend some time ordering them in advance. If I’m really short of preparation time, then I’ll grab some presents at airport stores, although of course that can prove more costly.

    “If you know someone very well, then a personalised gift is the best way to show your consideration. However, this can be time consuming if you are meeting a lot of people in a trip.

    “I would get something that most people would like to have and can share with their family, such as nutrition supplements or chocolates. I sometimes get souvenirs with a Cambridge or London feature (or whatever represents your city or country).”

    In a recent trip, Ting’s gifts included:

    • Tea (English Breakfast and Earl Grey) in nice tins
    • Scottish shortbread
    • For the first time, New Zealand Maluka Honey, “which approved to be quite popular among my female contacts!”

    Reciprocity is embedded in the Chinese relationship, so she often ends up with gifts to bring back: “This is typically Chinese tea, which we all enjoy in our office and with our visitors.”

    Like the tradition of the Christmas card, it is the intention that matters – not the value of gifts, she adds. “Don’t spend a lot on expensive gifts, especially if you are giving to Chinese government officials or SOE chiefs.  The current regulation is starting to look like what we have in the UK – officials must declare them if they are over a certain value. For those more formal occasions, use your company’s own corporate gifts, or consider getting some business souvenirs – for example cuff links with UK/China flags, which can be a safe gift.

    Finding help to plan your trip and organise your schedule is one of the ways Crayfish.io can assist people in business. It matches talented Chinese speaking professionals with Western businesses who need help in dealing with their Chinese partners and audiences, providing a source of qualified people to undertake projects and offer information, knowledge and cultural insight.

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Doing business with China: making the most of your visit

    By Crayfish

     

    Business trips to China can be both exhausting and enjoyable, typically involving a range of meetings and a busy schedule. So, it’s important to remain energetic and productive when travelling.

    How can you optimise your time? Here are a few tips from Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of Crayfish.io.

    Says Ting: “I usually visit multiple cities, even when on a short trip, and pack my schedule full of visits, meetings and calls.

    “At the outset, I carefully plan my itinerary so that I don’t waste precious working hours on travelling.  Domestic flights operate till late at night, so I would usually finish a proper day’s meetings, then fly in the early evening to arrive at my next destination for the following day.

    “I rarely fly in the morning on a working day because flights can be delayed (and they often are) which then disrupts the schedule.  The high-speed train network is more reliable for shorter distances and is now so extensive in China that it can cut the travel time by a large chunk. But do buy your train ticket in advance if you can, to avoid long queues at the station.”

    Like most people, she says, food is a large part of any trip: “And for me, it is also the pleasurable part,” comments Ting.

    “Meal times can be used not only to extend your business, but also to make it much more effective sometimes. Breakfast is a perfect way to catch up with old contacts, with whom I often discover new common interests.

    “Chinese people do not eat cold sandwiches at their desks for lunch, so this can be an effective way to get to know new contacts better.  I usually invite people who I meet late morning to go on to lunch together, so that we can discuss action points in a more relaxed manner.  During my latest trip last month, several business leads were generated during lunch with our business partners.

    “Dinner is a prime social occasion, so it is usually reserved for important relationships. For this reason, I would normally plan my dinners in advance.  In my last fortnight-long trip, I only had two evening meals when I ate on my own!  But I would not go for room service at the hotel –  it is always amazing to stroll into a side street after a long day of meetings, and I love to discover tempting dishes in a local’s favourite.”

    Ting says the etiquette for business dinners deserves more attention, so that will form the basis of a separate blog – watch this space.

    She adds: “Remember: enjoy the food and company, but always use the occasion to enhance your relationship building. This is what will help you to realise your Chinese dreams, whether that is to be the number one player in the Chinese market, or to make China your largest source of customers.”

    Finding help to plan your trip and organise your schedule is one of the ways Crayfish.io can assist people in business. It matches talented Chinese speaking professionals with Western businesses who need help in dealing with their Chinese partners and audiences, providing a source of qualified people to undertake projects and offer information, knowledge and cultural insight.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    The 4 biggest challenges Western businesses face in China

    By Crayfish

     

     

    What are the biggest obstacles for Western companies pursuing business opportunities in China?

    Ting Zhang, our CEO discovered four important challenges for SMEs when she visited the country earlier this month.

     

               (Ting in a business discussion during the British Day event in Chengdu. )

    • Rising costs

    Anyone who has been visiting China over a longer period of time will have noticed that the cost of living has increased enormously across the country. This is especially true in large cities, with property prices close to or even exceeding the UK in some locations.

    As a result, operating costs have been pushed to a new high.  Foreign companies must find ways to cut their costs, such as re-patriating their (potentially expensive) expats and restricting their regional offices to remove unnecessary layers of management. This gives more opportunity for such companies to attract local Chinese talent for senior positions, which in turn can help with the performance of your Chinese operation.

    • Competition

    Chinese companies are known to be quick to learn and imitate, but now many Chinese companies are bucking the trend by developing their own innovative products and services which are more suited to the local market.  This is especially true in the e-commerce and mobile app space, with BAT (the three big players in the Chinese internet and big data industry: Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent) now dominating the market and making it hard for foreign companies to compete.

    This is also the case in the services market, where many Chinese entrepreneurs have set up their own businesses to compete with the incumbent (foreign) players, in fields such as marketing and accounting services. This means that Western companies must keep innovating as well as providing consistent quality – which can help differentiate them from Chinese competitors.

    • Regulation

    On one hand, the Chinese government is relaxing import tariffs for some categories of goods and removing entry barriers for restricted sectors, but on the other hand, regulation such as compliance with party policy for joint ventures has made it harder for foreign businesses to operate in the same way they have in the past.  Western executives must stay on top of these regulatory changes to be compliant, and many rely on the Foreign Chambers in China to lobby the Chinese government.

    • Talent shortage

    Recruiting people with suitable skills in China has always been difficult. Now this has been exacerbated by rising costs and tougher competition from local players. Furthermore, the supply of talent is decreasing with the rapidly aging population. The second child policy will take years to have any impact on the labour market.

    Some Generation Ys in China have now started to lead a different career path from their elders, as the gig economy spreads into the country.  The word “Slash Youth” refers to someone who takes freelancing portfolio work in multiple fields, such as translation, marketing and business development.

    Crayfish has seen many of those based in China adopting this approach to their careers.  Known for their hardworking ethics and better command of English, using these new Chinese freelancing workers can be an excellent alternative to hiring a full-time person in China.

     

    How Crayfish.io can help

    The Crayfish.io platform can help you find such freelance talent. It matches Chinese speaking professionals with Western businesses who need help in dealing with their Chinese partners and audiences, providing a source of qualified people to undertake projects and offer information, knowledge and cultural insight.

    Business users post their projects on to the Crayfish website and freelancing Chinese speakers bid for the work, with the transaction carried out through the Crayfish.io platform. Users pay a fee after they accept a freelancer’s proposal, with payment – less commission – released on completion of the job. The Crayfish team also offers to project manage on behalf of the client for larger and more complex tasks.

    Moreover, to help you overcome the talent shortage challenge, Crayfish.io is hosting an event in London on 28th June for a roundtable discussion about:

    • what are the most effective channels to recruit the talent you want
    • what to expect of job applications and how to spot the real talent
    • what are the motivational factors that influence their Chinese workforce especially the young generation in order to create the bonds of loyalty
    • seeing the Chinese staff in a social and cultural context and build a multi-cultural team across UK and China
    • what are the alternatives to a traditional talent hiring and management approach

    If you are interested to come, please register here.

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Doing business with China: communicating effectively

    By Crayfish

     

    Unless you can speak fluent Chinese and have a decent understanding of the culture, communicating with your business connections in China can sometimes be frustrating. Find the right way and it could help you to breeze through the process, advises Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of Crayfish.io.

    Says Ting: “In England, we still rely on email for every kind of business communication. However, email is only used for documentation inquiries or initial contacts in China. Instead people speak or call on WeChat – the software that almost everyone is using there. I’d be really surprised to find a person in China who does not use WeChat.

    She explains: “Basically, WeChat is a combination of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and WhatsApp, and a good thing about it is that you can get very personal with senior decision makers. For example, if I contact the managing director or general manager of a company through WeChat, I will get an immediate response.”

    Leveraging Chinese social media to benefit your business will be the subject of a further post from Crayfish.io, so watch this space.

    Facetime, more than once

    Ting continues: “Even with today’s remote-control applications, nothing beats face to face time. If you want to do business in China, this is the most important thing. It doesn’t matter what your occupation is, the Chinese in business prefer face to face communication. What is more, it will help you with branding and creditability and will always help you to secure meetings with government officials or Chinese business leaders.

    This is particularly important if you have a problem, she adds: “Instead of trying to solve it by email, I would suggest you go to China. For example, I used to work with a client in Cambridge whose business model is licensing and cell phone software. One day their sales director phoned me and said ‘I’m just about to send an email to a company that owes us a fee of 1 million dollars. We are having an argument over whether they should pay us this fee and we’ve been back and forth with emails.’

    “She asked me to have a final look at the email correspondence to see if I could help solve the problem. Without even reading through all 10 pages, I called her back immediately to suggest she visit the client in China instead of using email. She went and three days later called me to say that she had spent all day with her customer and solved the problem. This would not have been possible with email communications.

    Don’t get lost in translation

    “If you plan to visit China, make it productive. Make sure you confirm your meeting time with your clients before you leave, because in China, everything happens really fast. And make sure you have an interpreter who understands the cultural as well as the linguistic differences.  If you want to do business in China, I suggest you have your own interpreter because you can control the quality and it will work so much better,” she adds.

    Finding an interpreter to meet your needs is one of the ways Crayfish.io can assist people in business. It matches talented Chinese speaking professionals with Western businesses who need help in dealing with their Chinese partners and audiences, providing a source of qualified people to undertake projects and offer information, knowledge and cultural insight.

    Business users post their projects on to the Crayfish website and freelancing Chinese speakers bid for the work, with the transaction carried out through the Crayfish.io platform. Users pay a fee after they accept a freelancer’s proposal, with payment – less commission – released on completion of the job. The Crayfish team also offers to project manage on behalf of the client for larger and more complex tasks.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Understanding the Chinese culture: #1 Traditions versus modern China

    By Crayfish

    Crayfish.io offers insight into Chinese business culture.

    If you intend to interact with Chinese people for business purposes, it is advisable to learn some basics about the Chinese culture, which is very different from the West. In a series of blog posts over the coming weeks, we aim to close your knowledge gap and help you prepare for doing business with China.

    We start by introducing Confucianism – the discipline and furniture of the mind, and the dominant philosophy and ideology in China for over 2500 years.

     

    Born in 551 BC, Kongzi, also known as Confucius, was a great thinker, politician and academic.  He lived during the Chou dynasty, an era known for its moral laxity. Later in life, he wandered through many states of China, giving advice to their rulers. His writings deal primarily with individual morality and ethics, and the proper exercise of political power by the rulers. Confucianism has been part of the Chinese social fabric and way of life since then. However, Confucianism is a set of ethical rules and not a religion, as some people describe it in the West.

    Confucianism propagates “Ren” (Love) and “Li” (rituals). It regards the moral responsibility of the family as the cornerstone of order in society: first comes family, then society, and finally, the individual. Respect for hierarchy was advocated by Confucius to keep society in good order. For individual behaviour, Confucianism emphasises the importance of self-restraint, self-control, a good work ethic and moral principles.

    The social ethics and moral teachings of Confucius are blended with the Taoist communion with nature and Buddhist concepts of the afterlife, to form a set of complementary, peacefully co-existent and ecumenical religions.

    Chinese people are proud of their rich traditions and adhere to them as normal ways of life. For example, during the Qingming Festival in early April people travel (sometime hundreds of miles) to “sweep” the tombs of their ancestors to remember them but also to obtain their blessings.

    Economic development in China over the past three decades has transformed the life of Chinese people, especially for those living in its cities. When you travel to China, you will find that today’s China is an amalgamation of old world traditions and a westernised lifestyle. Amazingly, the two co-exist in harmony just like the traditional Yin & Yang, the formula of balance.

    Crayfish.io is now offering a rare opportunity for you to see the modern China in the traditional Chinese cultural context, through the eyes of talented Chinese artists. Tickets are available for the London Original Print Fair,3-6 May at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, where Cambridge-based ArtChinais among the exhibitors.

    As a special offer to Crayfish.io followers, you could register here  for free entry.

    More cultural insight to come. Watch this space!

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Introducing Crayfish.io influencer: Helen Tse MBE

    By Crayfish

    Making important connections is at the heart of Crayfish.io – the unique online platform dedicated to helping Western companies do business in China – and some of these lead to unexpected outcomes.

    One of the bilingual speakers attracted to the organisation turns out to be a hugely accomplished and influential person in her own right – Helen Tse MBE.  A Cambridge-educated corporate lawyer, she is also a chef and acclaimed restauranteur, co-owner of the award-winning* Sweet Mandarin in Manchester.

    Helen Tse MBE, Premier Li, David Cameron (ex PM of UK), Lisa Tse MBE

     

    And if that wasn’t enough, she has written a memoir, also entitled Sweet Mandarin, which has now become a play, Mountains. It makes its London debut next week (Friday April 20th at the Stratford Circus Arts Theatre E15 1BY) and continues across the country until 2 June.

    Helen grew up in the UK but always felt a piece of her story was missing. As her extraordinary memoir explains, she comes from a family of strong women, with three generations held together by one lifeline – food. Celebrity Chef Ken Hom commented on her book Sweet Mandarin:“A gripping tale of struggle, laughter, love and food… with a universal story of survival that will move your soul.”

    Crayfish.io’s brand – ‘the global online platform to unlock your Chinese dreams’ – resonates with Helen. She is very happy to join Crayfish.io network, and she will act as our influencer to help young generation to realise their Chinese dreams.

    Read her answers to some key questions below:

    Why are you collaborating with Crayfish.io?

    As a corporate lawyer, I want to extend my network and work with clients both large and small. On the non-business side, I like the idea of Crayfish.io helping people to realise their potential.

    What do you think of the Crayfish.io business model?

    Crayfish is both innovative and inspirational, allowing talented Chinese speakers to use their skills to benefit both themselves and business clients. Often these are Chinese people studying in the UK or possibly people working in jobs that don’t necessarily enable them to pursue their real interests. Crayfish gives them the opportunity to pitch for diverse projects and to earn money in the process.

    How did you come to open a restaurant?

    I studied law at Cambridge University and qualified as a tax solicitor with Clifford Chance in London and Hong Kong. I moved back to my hometown, Manchester, to work for PricewaterhouseCoopers, where I ended up heading the China Business Desk.  But after returning from a family trip to Hong Kong, I felt I had rediscovered my roots – my grandmother and mother were both restauranteurs. I was compelled to do something in business with my two sisters.

    My twin Lisa and my younger sister Janet all graduated and went into professional careers: Lisa is in finance and Janet’s an engineer. But despite working in these different fields, we decided to go into the restaurant business and return to our roots.

    Everyone has their own life to lead and I believe we must follow our dreams. My passion is food, people and business and at that time, Sweet Mandarin was an expression of our dreams.

    Are you a lawyer or a chef?

    I am both! I am a partner with Clarke Willmott LLP, a law firm with 700 staff across seven offices, where I specialise in buying and selling companies. I also work with Chinese investors who want to invest in the UK and help them with their corporate and immigration law requirements. I am proud that I have managed to keep working as a solicitor and help people.

    I am also still a co-owner of Sweet Mandarin and cook with my twin sister Lisa. We have cooked for Premier Li, President of China, and for two British Prime Ministers – David Cameron and Theresa May. In 2014 Lisa and I both received MBEs from Her Majesty the Queen for services to Food and Drink because she buys our sauces.

    I want to continue to be both a chef and a lawyer because you will always need to know your rights and I love good food. No path ever closes completely unless you want it to, and life is more fluid than we generally make it out to be.

    Surely you don’t have time for anything else?

    We also sell our sauces, run a cookery school and corporate team building days, and have written six books between us. Three cookbooks made The TimesBestseller List. My most recent law book was Doing Business After Brexit.

    Sweet Mandarinhas been published in 33 countries and will appear on Kindle. It is also being translated into Mandarin Chinese this summer.

    There are 40 flavours of Sweet Mandarin sauces available now, including Barbecue, Sweet Chilli and Sweet and Sour – they are all gluten, MSG and additive free and are available from our website www.sweetmandarin.net

    What do you think of the play based on your memoirs?

    The play has been adapted from Sweet Mandarin. It’s also remarkably the first ever true story told about a British Chinese family.

    The play sold out in Manchester Royal Exchange and has had excellent reviews. The lead roles are played by East Asian actresses and actors; the music by the talented Ruth Chan; the director the sought-after Jennifer Tan; the playwright is In-Sook Chappell and the book by the first British-born Chinese author. It’s a first on many levels. Finally, through this play, the East Asian voice can be heard.

    * Sweet Mandarin beat 10,000 restaurants to win celebrity chef Gordon Ramsey s ‘Best Local Chinese Restaurant’ category on Channel 4 TV’s The F Word.

     

    MOUNTAINS: The Dreams of Lily Kwok

    “Visually arresting, admirably unflinching depiction of an extraordinary real-life success story”
    The Stage
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐

    “Chappell’s script is a triumph, showcasing not only strong women, but strong East Asian women…immensely moving, humbling and inspiring story.”
    The Reviews Hub
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐

    “A remarkable production that combines a cleverly structured script with outstanding performances and an impressive  set to tell a compelling story of one woman’s life”
    Manchester Theatre Award
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐

     

    A Royal Exchange Theatre, Yellow Earth and Black Theatre Live co-production.

    By In-Sook Chappell. Directed by Jennifer Tang.   Based on the memoir Sweet Mandarin by Helen Tse

    I invited you into my past… And you invited me into your future.

    Helen has grown up in the UK, but always felt a piece of her story was missing. Amidst the skyscrapers and bustling streets of Hong Kong, she meets her grandmother, Lily Kwok, and steps into a past of shocking family secrets that will change her life forever.

    This evocative new play by award winning writer In-Sook Chappell, tells the extraordinary story of the women behind the famous Manchester restaurant Sweet Mandarin. Based on Helen Tse’s bestselling family memoir of three generations held together with one lifeline- food.

    PERFORMANCE DATES

    Click on links to buy tickets 

    22 Mar – 7 April Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester
    St Ann’s Square, Manchester, M2 7DH
    www.royalexchange.co.uk | 0161 8339833

    18 – 21 Apr Stratford Circus Arts Centre, London
    Theatre Square, Stratford, London, E15 1BX
    stratford-circus.com/ | 020 8279 1080

    24 – 25 Apr Theatre Royal Bury St Edmunds
    Westgate Street, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, 1P331QR
    www.theatreroyal.org | 01284 769 505

    27 – 28 Apr Lighthouse, Poole
    21 Kingland Road, Poole, Dorset, BH15 1UG
    www.lighthousepoole.co.uk | 01202 280 000

    1 – 2 May Key Theatre, Peterborough
    Embankment Road, Peterborough, PE1 1EF
    www.vivacity-peterborough.com | 01733 207 239

    5 May Theatre Royal Margate
    Addington Street, Margate, CT9 1PW
    www.theatreroyalmargate.com | 01843 292 795

    10 – 12 May Derby Theatre
    15 Theatre Walk, St Peter’s Quarter, Derby, DE1 2NF
    www.derbytheatre.co.uk | 01332 593 939

    16 – 19 May Watford Palace Theatre
    20 Clarendon Road, Watford, WD17 1JZ
    watfordpalacetheatre.co.uk | 01923 225 671

    21 – 23 May Sheffield Crucible Theatre
    55 Norfolk Street, Sheffield, S11AD
    www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk | 0114 249 6000

    24 – 25 May Queen’s Hall Arts Centre, Hexham
    Beaumont Street, Hexham, Northumberland, NE46 3LS
    www.queenshall.co.uk | 01434 652 477

    30 May – 2 June Belgrade Theatre, Coventry
    Belgrade Square, Coventry, CV1 1GS
    www.belgrade.co.uk | 024 7655 3055

     

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    2018: Where are the opportunities for business in China?

    By Crayfish

     

    Ting Zhang, our founder provides insight into the sectors and industries which offer the most potential for UK and international companies in the Chinese market.

    Speaking at a recent webinar for the China-Britain Business Council (CBBC), Ting said: “Most organisations are keen to find out how to sell their products or services into China. The good news is that, no matter what sector you are in, there are some business opportunities, but some sectors offer more potential and are quicker to get into. These include:

    • Artificial intelligence (AI)/Machine Learning

    AI is absolutely the hottest area in China. A lot of investment has been made in this field and if you are in this sector you will find that it is a door that has already been opened in many places.

    • Education

    Education has also been one of the most promising sectors. In fact, there is also a lot of investment into the UK to enable Chinese students to undergo British education, with service providers including schools and technology companies.

    • Elderly care solutions

    As most people know, Chinese society has aged rapidly, more rapidly than people expected. The latest data says that in about 10-15 years’ time, 60% of the population will be over 60, so there are a lot of opportunities there, whether you provide infrastructure or other services for elderly care.

    • E-commerce

    The Chinese economy has been growing at a speed that no other market can match, so for e-commerce companies, the opportunities remain abundant. Retailers can sellyour brand to China, while logistic and transportation providers play an important role. Electronic payment methods such as WeChat pay or AliPay are now everywhere.

    • Agriculture – technology and food safety

    This sector has always been important, but now, particularly with the government’s determination to ensure food is safer, there is a lot government support available.

    • Medical devices

    This has also been one of the sectors with ongoing opportunities, but recently some regulations have made the business easier for Western companies. For example, clinical trial results for medical devices from elsewhere are now accepted, whereas in the past the trials had to be conducted in China.

    Of course, setting up in China or doing business there depends on a wide variety of factors –most importantly, the ability to communicate effectively with both Chinese partners and customers. Crayfish.io, with its bank of Chinese business experts and talented bilingual freelancers, is ideally placed to help. If you are interested to discuss how Crayfish.io can help you realise those opportunities, please contact us to find out more.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Crayfish had a great day at last week’s China Conference

    By Ting Zhang

    “Crayfish had a great day at last week’s China Conference with lots of interest received from delegates from all kinds of businesses, ranging from British mother and baby brands to industrial manufacturers, from China’s telecom giants to railway logistics companies. They are interested in using our platform to find Chinese speakers for translation of brochures as well as digital marketing. Some are even keen to start Madanrin lessons!! It was great to share our updates with Ambassador Liu and to introduce Crayfish.io to Minister of State Mark Field, and to welcome Minister Counsellors Jin Xu and Jiang Sunan to our stand.

    I enjoyed our panel session about getting goods to China and glad my message about effective communication got across well. Thanks to my team for their great efforts today and especially for getting some deliciously looking buiscuits and cupcakes, which proved really popular!!  We look forward to following up with the enquiries from the day, and helping more SMEs to do business with China. “

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    How do I register an official WeChat account as a foreign company?

    By Crayfish

    WeChat is now China biggest multi-purpose social media platform. With 1 billion active users monthly, WeChat is THE platform used by Chinese customers to follow and interact with their favourite brands. It’s vital for businesses who want to engage with their Chinese consumers to have an official WeChat account.

    What type of Wechat account should I get?

    There are three different types of WeChat official accounts:

    1. Subscription paid account
    2. Service account
    3. Enterprise account

    Enterprise account is designed for internal management of companies. It requires the account owner to approve the followers, so the content will be limited to authorised users only. Therefore, most companies will usually choose either Subscription or Service account.

    Now, what’s the difference between the Subscription and the Service account? In a nutshell, the Subscription account enables you to post more frequently (daily), while Service account only allows you to post 4 times/ month. However, notifications for any updates on Service accounts will appear directly in user’s conversation log, whilst the posts from a subscription accounts are limited in a subscription folder without any visible notifications on WeChat main operation panel. Furthermore, many of WeChat unique features such as CRM, custom menus are only available to Service accounts.

    In general, if your product offering is content centred (e.g. Media, KOL, newspaper and magazine etc.), you should go for the Subscription account. In other cases, especially when you run an eCommerce business, Crayfish will suggest that you open a Service account.

    How to register an official WeChat account?

    There are two main ways for overseas companies to register an official account on WeChat.

    Option 1: Register an international account using your own oversea business license.

    It’s a longer application process (2-3 months) and costs more than 1000 USD to open. It does have some great advantage to control the account completely, although it also has some drawbacks:

    • Higher annual verification fee charged by Tencent (operator for WeChat)
    • Taking 2-3 months to setup
    • Registering through qualified agencies only
    • You can only register service accounts (not subscription) through this route, and there are some restricted features.

    Option 2: Use a 3rd-party Chinese license to create the account.

    Most companies adopt this method, in which case, your account will have your name, description and logo, but will still be linked to the legal entity which created for the account. It is a lot quicker (within 2 weeks) and it costs much less compared to the overseas account.

    The main requirements to create such an account are:

    • Business license of a company in China
    • Access to the bank account of this company (the verification fee has to be paid by this company, or a small amount is sent to the company’s account as a “verification code”)
    • The Chinese ID card of a Chinese citizen with a WeChat Payment account linked to his/her bank card

    This creation process usually takes around 1 to 2 weeks and the only costs (if you handle it on your own) is a 300 RMB verification fee (about $50 USD)

    What’s the next step?

    Crayfish usually suggests that any company without legal entity in China to register through 3rd-party Chinese license. Furthermore, you could verify your WeChat account once it’s set up. Verification is only currently available to Chinese official accounts.

    Our freelancers and partners are able to help you to prepare these relevant documents and manage their final submission. We also offer a managed package service which includes account set up via Crayfish and WeChat platform management.

    If you are interested, why don’t you post a project on Crayfish.io now? You can see some budget suggestions on our Digital Marketing page. We are also very happy to answer your questions. Please feel free to contact us.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    How do I register a verified Weibo account?

    By Crayfish

    Sina Weibo, known as the Chinese twitter, is one of the most popular social media sites in China. With over 392 million monthly active users, it is the top social media platform Crayfish would recommend for your brand to start with.
    What type of Weibo account should I get?

    There are four different types of accounts on Weibo:

    1. Regular personal account
    2. Regular company account
    3. Verified personal account
    4. Verified company account

    There’s also a VIP upgrade that can be purchased in addition to anyone of the 4 accounts above.

    Crayfish suggests that all companies should aim to have a verified company account. The verified account means that your company has been vetted. It gives much more credibility to your account, which is especially important for consumers who can be skeptical dealing with businesses overseas. A verified account also comes with additional marketing features: e.g. access to the activity centre and launching reward winning activities to your followers (e.g. promotions and prizes)

    What documents are required?

    If you have a Chinese business license, you could register as a local Chinese company. The documents that you will need are straight forward:

    • Most up to date information about the company, including official trading name of the business and contact email address;
    • Detailed information of the business license (e.g. registration number)
    • Scanned copy of business license and certificate of organization code.

    There are two scenarios of how a corporate account can be verified if you are a foreign company without Chinese business license.

    1. Verifying an account via a dealer/distributor

    If you have already registered your trademark in China, you can go with this option. You could verify your Weibo account via your distributor. Your distributor needs to prepare the following documents:

    • Certificate of dealership to prove legitimacy of your dealer’s or distributor’s operations for your products in China;
    • Chinese business license of your dealer or distributor.

    2. Verifying your account directly

    If you are an overseas company and your trademark is not registered in China, you will need to follow this process. In addition, you will need to pay a fee based on your location. The documents that you need to prepare are listed below:

    • Company’s registration documents and business licenses, together with their translations into Chinese;
    • Application Covering Letter and Third Party Authorization letter that should include the company’s seal and/or company director/chairman’s signature;
    • Purchase Order Form;
    • Official website URL;
    • Detailed introduction to the company’s products and/or services;
    • Operation contact person or team contact information.

    What’s the next step?

    All your submitted information will be carefully checked prior to final approval and they will ask for additional information if they are not clear about nature of your business. We would strongly suggest you to commission someone who is familiar with most updated information as well as living in the same time zone. China is 8 hours ahead of UK, having someone locally would significantly speed up the formality process.

    Freelancers and partners at Crayfish can help you with any questions, translating and notarising your documents, submission and the final verification for your Weibo account.

    If you are interested, why don’t you post a project on Crayfish.io now? You can see some budget suggestions on our Digital Marketing page. We are also very happy to answer your questions. Please feel free to contact us.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Discover what Chinese do on New Year’s Eve!

    By Crayfish

    Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is an important Chinese holiday celebrated at the turn of the traditional lunisolar.

    This is without doubt the largest annual human migration of the year on our planet. Millions of people embark on homebound journeys in all directions, radiating from mostly first tier cities in China to smaller towns and villages, covering a land mass of over 9 million square kilometres. From the biting cold of the north to the lush greens of the south, people from every region celebrate this annual event in their own ways.

    Tommy
    Dumplings are an absolute essential on the menu for the northern part of China on New Year’s Eve. These delicate, little boat-shaped parcels can be stuffed with all kinds of fillings, for example fish, red meats or poultry, mixed with vegetables. The senior members of the family who prepare the meals often randomly put some ‘special items’ into the little parcels for the children. And whoever picks them during the meal would be considered lucky for the rest of year!

    Zhe-ang
    People from the southeast part of China cannot leave behind ‘NianGao’ (rice cake) or ‘TangYuan’  (sweet dumplings) on New Year’s Eve on their dinner table. Both are made of sticky rice, which has been pounded into a very thick paste that can be moulded into any shape. The small, round dumplings – TangYuan  –symbolise family unity,  perfectly suited in this festive season.

    Jiao
    It’s a tradition for my family to sit together and watch the New Year’s Gala on Chinese State Television, which is a truly remarkable show that has been running for over 30 years since it was first aired in 1983. The show has had a huge impact on modern Chinese pop culture and generations of people who grew up with the show. It is an essential programme for many households.

    Jing
    Red, corresponding with fire, symbolises good fortune and joy, so red is found everywhere during Chinese New Year. From the palaces which are glittered with neon lights to their neighbouring narrow alleyways, red lanterns hang over every corner of the city and fireworks light up the sky. They amplify the festive mood, while many people may take a stroll in a flower fayre or rush to the nearest temple for the best local shows.

    Chinese New Year is by far the most important public holiday in China, but it is also a great opportunity to tap into this enormous market when most people are resting at home.

    However, because of the enormity of it, with distinctive cultural characteristics from region to region, you may need a helping hand to reach your intended audience. Crayfish.io, through our highly skilled, carefully vetted bilingual freelancers, offers a tailor-made service, designed to suit all kinds of enterprise at a competitive price.

    Get in touch with Crayfish.io now to find out how we can help you connect, position and boost your business in China!

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Crayfish.io Adds More Language Power

    By Crayfish

    With a new strategic partnership just formed from the outset of 2018, Crayfish.io can now offer significant cost savings to large translation and website localisation projects, in addition to our popular freelancing translation services via the platform www.crayfish.io. This means we can now cater for the needs in multi-lingual support, no matter the size of the businesses and their location. This new partnership will help solve language barriers for trading between China and the world.

    Our founder and CEO Ting Zhang had the pleasure to meet with Mr Qing Wu (Chairman of Shanghai Stock Exchange) and Ms Elisha Ding (CEO of Glodom) during her recent trip to China. As one of the most competent techcrats in the Chinese capital markets, Mr Qing Wu will add a lot to the further development of Shanghai as the country’s financial capital.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    China Changes the Way It Manages Yuan After Currency’s Jump

    By Crayfish

    China’s central bank has made a change to the regime used to manage the yuan, effectively removing a component used by banks to calculate their submissions to the currency’s daily reference rate, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    David Cameron Leads a £750m UK-China Fund

    By Crayfish

    Great to see the former PM leading the UK-China Fund. The news says “It will help firms to overcome hurdles such as cultural differences and regulations in the two countries”. The multilingual talents on Crayfish.io project marketplace can just help the UK and Chinese firms to achieve that! Sign up to post Chinese projects for free at www.crayfish.io today.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    The Founder & CEO of Crayfish.io is Featured on UK-Chinese Times

    By Crayfish

    Our founder and CEO, Ting Zhang, was interviewed by UK-Chinese Times (英中时报), one of the most influential Chinese newspaper in the UK. Ting has shared her rich life experience and the mission and vision of crayfish.io
    (Article in Chinese)

    The Founder & CEO of Crayfish.io is Featured on UK-Chinese Times


    近日,英中时报特约记者对Crayfish.io创始人及CEO张婷女士进行了独家专访。张婷向大家分享了自己丰富多彩的人生经验和创建Crayfish.io的初衷

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Crayfish.io Helps You Catch Up on the Latest Chinese Business Trends

    By Crayfish

    Ting Zhang, Founder and CEO of Cambridge-based Crayfish.io, has been connecting with some of industry’s brightest minds at recent events and webinars. Her journey in the past few weeks highlights a few of the latest Chinese business trends:
    •Opportunities for UK companies – ‘One Belt One Road’
    •China’s leadership role in global economy
    •Practical advice & tips from industry experts
    •Guiding first steps into successful business execution

    (more…)

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    The Inside Track on Entering China

    By Crayfish

    Well-known Chinese companies were invited to a lunch panel, discussing practical tips on entering the Chinese market. Those with experience of successfully entering China spoke of the need to understand the cultural and language barriers. Tips on avoiding classic pitfalls were also given.

    View strategies offered by Chinese market experts —>

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Events offer insight into doing business with China

    By Crayfish

    Our Founder and CEO, Ting Zhang, was invited to exclusive events from various sectors, sharing her professional insights into trading with China. Ting highlighted the importance of effective and facilitated communication to overcome cultural barriers and discussed the role of China as a major player in global economy with many industry’s brightest minds.

     

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Crayfish is on the cover of China Daily newspaper

    By Ting Zhang

    Crayfish.io is on the cover page of China Daily, the widest print circulation of any English-language newspaper in China with an international audience.

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Chinese Dinner Etiquette – To Pay Or Not To Pay?

    By Ting Zhang

    This article got it right – worthwhile to read and practise! And good luck ?

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Mastering the use of emojis on Wechat

    By Ting Zhang

    I haven’t mastered the use of half of the emojis on Wechat but already made a few mistakes according to this article – have a look and see if you have got them right?

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">

    Crayfish is generating more awareness

    By Ting Zhang

    Crayfish is generating more awareness in the tech clusters in Cambridge but at the same time businesses have signed up from outside the UK – the latest additions are the Netherlands and Italy! Thanks so much to those who have been supporting us. We will continue to improve the Crayfish.io platform and our services to help you.

    The local media has reported Crayfish:

    Share this post on social media
    Facebook
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Google+
    https://www.crayfish.io/crayfish-blog">